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20121101
20121130
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tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair will now recognizes the gentleman from california, for five minutes. mr. garamendi: i thank you, mr. speaker. i join my colleagues here in congress from both sides of the aisle to call for the end to the war in afghanistan. after more than a decade of war, with now more than ,000 lives lost, and hundreds of millions of american tax dollars spent, it's time for our troops to come home to their families. i represent the military communities of travis air force base and come january i will represent the community of beale air force base as well. i can tell you from firsthand experience that the men and women who serve in our nation's military and their families are america's finest. they are not afraid of sacrifice . they joined the armed forces because they love our country and they are willing to give everything to keep our nation safe. but their sacrifice must be for a reason. if we are going to ask them to risk life and limb on the other side of the world, it must be for a mission that is vital to our nation's security. we can no longer say t
: it is the sum of its house district + two for the senate. each state has two senators. california has 55 electoral votes. the district of columbia is awarded three electoral votes. host: jim from iowa, hello. caller: i have a question. in past years with george bush and al gore, that went back and forth. are they planning to make changes to extensive monitoring ? it is a back and forth thing. i have watched this election thing go for 17 months. i used to be a democrat and i'm so disgusted. i went republican. i have a lot of concerns and reservations because i have seen a lot of things change in how things operate and how politicians operates and i am concerned. i got early to vote. host: thank you. guest: the electoral college has not rallied the masses. it is an issue that deals with political process. we have the 2000 election that george w. bush lost the popular vote. that election -- the issue discussion dominated by what happened in florida. there was not a lot of talk about scrapping the electoral college. there has not been a big movement to overhaul the electoral college. it is k
to california. her family would like to go back. she might still around again because -- she raised $215 million. she is the house's biggest fund- raiser. >> we will end up with a more polarized congress. steny hoyer is more moderate. he is an institutional -- has been around for decades and represents a lot of the new democrats. the big question will be, will party, a caucus dominated by liberals and i would say democrats are much more liberal than your average democrat around the country. will they tolerate steny hoyer who they do not see as one of their own? they see him as a compromiser. >> the white house has been ignoring -- democrats have been an afterthought. if they had a leader, there would have more muscle. >> one thing that i find interesting to watch is when you can step back and look at the bigger picture, you have a house that is not budging and testing republican. which means that how frustrated that american people are about the non action, about the tea party. this means that i think barack obama should be on the losing end of this campaign because the american people want a ch
, california. we have janice from california and barbara lee, who has become renowned and her outspokenness about the wars in afghanistan and iran. with a small group of women, she did lead the charge toward ending the war in iraq. we also have donna christiansen from the virgin islands who is here. and mrs. clark who is on the homeland security committee from new york. we have heard a great deal from delicate eleanor holmes norton. i will give you the short and version of which she said. what unmitigated gull for these men to attack the permit representative to united states. all of us have been disappointed about the results of the election. becauseers this woman, they do not feel they have have the ability to batter president obama is something that we, the women, are not going to stand by. and watch. they are reckless speculation. it is unworthy of their officers -- offices as it said. there was a time when our regarded mr. mccain as a gentleman. i am sad that this is not one of those moments. here we see this great senator rushing off to a press event rather than going to a briefing --
profound if you live in a glass house cast no stones. we've been joined by laura richardson from california. thank you for joining us here. this very unqualified woman of course spear headed efforts to bring the international sanctions against i ran, sanctions on -- iran, sanctions on north korea and has brought significant to bringing down kadafi. we now are going to hear from a very special colleague, terri sule from the seventh district of alabama. she has very special insight into the qualifications and integrity of susan rice. thank you for joining us. >> good morning. today i stand with my colleagues, proudly stand with my colleagues in expressing our outrage about the unfair attacks against the u.s. ambassador susan rice. these recent attacks are nothing short of offensive. nothing short of offensive. leading the charge to oppose ambassador rice are our senators who profess to want to block any potential nomination of this overly qualified public serve ant. and i for you cannot sit back like all of us and not say this is wrong. it's not only wrong, it's actually unpatriot i can. to b
, there are two in arizona that have yet to be called, 3 in california, 1 in north carolina, and one in florida. these have not been called because ballots are still being counted. mostly overseas and military balance, some early voting, especially in arizona. that is what is still being counted. host: are any of these expected to go to a recount? is it just provisional ballots and absentee ballots? guest: i think a couple will go to recounts. the closest, i believe, is in california in the seventh district. i think that will definitely be going to a recount. also in north carolina, the margin is 400 votes in a race with mike macentire. another is inlflorid awhere allen west is behind by 2400 votes. i think c-span viewers are familiar with him and knows he is not somebody that gives up easily. host: what would be the biggest upset from your perspective from the stresses that have not been called? guest: i think the biggest upset would be the race in arizona's second district which is where ron barber is the incumbent. host: that is the aide to former congressman gabby gifford. guest: this was h
-- alex from california, a republican caller. caller: good morning. thank you for c-span. i have complete trust in the fbi, cia, at home and security. i have complete trust within the confines of their agency walls. if you look at all of the botched terrorist plots that have been occurring since 9/11, it is absolutely amazing what our agencies are doing to keep us safe. who i do not trust is the white house suits who apparently put a spin on the nsa's official briefs and input on worldwide events. i believe the white house puts a political spin on everything that comes to the president, to the secretary of state. then to the american people. it was 9/11 when we had benghazi going down. that is a data i think the president would rather have nothing going down. apparently there was something going down. with petraeus, is it not ironic that he is now being the scrutinized over these extramarital affairs when he is about to testify in regards to what happened in benghazi. >>let's get a couple more comments on facebook and twitter. thank you for all of your calls. coming up next, congressman r
yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from california, ms. woolsey, for five minutes. ms. woolsey: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, it's the time of year when families reunite and renew their very close connections, connections that are actually in most instances the most precious parts of our lives. this thanksgiving i know all of us were grateful for the company of those we love the most. but more than 2,000 american families sat at tables where there was one less serving of the thanksgiving meal just a week ago. those families lost a loved one in the deadly war in afghanistan. now more than 11 years long and a tragically reckless policy. i'm personally grateful for the service of all of our afghanistan veterans and for their sacrifice and for the sacrifice of our military families. but sometimes i don't know how we as a congress and a nation can look them right straight in the face after everything we've put them through. the benefits of this war don't come close to justifying the devastating human cost. not just fatalities but disfiguring wou
and california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail. possibly in hopes of being able to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still counting a lot of districts, but we have seen eight or nine competitive seats with a very interesting st
-mails -- that is mike from california. nancy from texas says -- front page of "the financial times" has the picture that a lot of folks have in their papers this morning. al in indiana on are democrats' line, good morning. caller: good morning. i believe that you can add to that question and put on a few more words. you look at who the president had to reach across the aisle to. i go back to one of president obama's addresses to congress when congressman wilson from california shouted out in front of a live audience on tv, "you lie." i think that is indicative of where this republican party is. the entire country is being held hostage because of the republican party's refusal to evolve. demographically, the republican party does not pay respect to women, to minorities, and they have no national candidates for office as a result of that. they are worried about all things vagina and ridiculous things like that. host: darlene on a republican line. what is your opinion? caller: i want to tell you i used to be a democrat. 14idn't like it when those democrats left town, got paid, and weren't there to vot
battleground states. millions of ballots are still being counted, 4 million in california alone. sometime today we think we will be officially the winner in florida. as of right now, total turnout and number of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we planned for, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same percent of the electorate as in 2008. we got 65% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, voting rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battleground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino vote since 19
in california. when he was left to california, he was shown around by the conservative components of the party, the governor, who voted for roosevelt and he never saw johnson. he took that very personally on election day. he lost california by 3773 votes. it took two days. he was president for 10 minutes. he calls the his apartment in new york, the butler answer is, and he says, "the president- elect has gone to bed." "welcome and will you tell him when he wakes up that he's no longer president?" literally that is what happened. in those days it took a few days to get all of the returns from the west which turned out to be to his volley. been the greatest issue became preparedness. host: this history show a good track record of when these problems arise to finding ways to counteract them or at least fix them before the next elections take place? guest: policy issues? host: or procedures, what ever. guest: survival has a remarkable effect on political parties. it was unified and vehemently anti-wilson. it came up that year to be warren g. harding of ohio. the rest, as they say, is history. host
, we don't know what is going to happen. nancy pelosi is in california. her home in napa valley was broken into on monday. so, she actually has some little housekeeping to take care of. apparently people broken. they don't know what is missing. sort of this bizarre thing. in the event he does retire or resign from congress, steny hoyer would be the front runner to take over as minority leader. the subtext -- almost a shakespearean subtext -- between steny hoyer and nancy pelosi, they have in turn together on capitol hill in the 1960's and they have been rivals for years. the last 10 or 12 years, competing for leadership positions in the democratic caucus. hoyer would very much like to be minority leader and he would make a bid. the question now is whether pelosi is trying to live up somebody who she -- who would be her successor of choice. there is a lot of trauma and we just don't know where the dominoes will fall until we know her intentions. it >> just to wrap up -- who is in the next generation of would- be party leaders who would like to have pelosi's endorsement or if not
will be seen in retrospect as something close to the proposition in california. incredibly shortsighted with long-term consequences. whatever those republican governors and legislators thought they were doing, every latino population in the country and thought not only are you not competing for are revoked, you do not want our vote to. the gop is not even getting up to have argument about policies of this point. there is this time of tremendous identity of -- how often do you go to church? there is the identity politics. our system is frozen with the two out of three close presidential elections happening. >> right here. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking a
for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our interest in politics fostered and have such great memories of the uni
party to a degree. i admit i'm a nate tive california person and i didn't get it. ho can we have this dialogu without screaming at each other. >> c we talk to each other and not scream at one another? >> i hope so. i think when you look at our politics and look at some of the dysfunction in washington and now we have the fiscal cliff issue that is are fwfer congress and i think it's a real open question about whether we're going to have a politically induced recession. we're 40, 50 days away. you see a lot of turbulence in the markets over the next months but this is a political crisis that is going to be bring about an economic crisis if it doesn't get solved. but for the entire history of the country people do profoundly disagree with each other, have been and sometimes don't like each other very much have been able to sit across from each other and do the business of the american people. and that's what the moment requires now. on the question of screaming at each other we should understand that there are tremendous market incentives for people to go on tv and attack each othe
not hard hit, or some as far away as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment, crews, et cetera, into new jersey. we were able to get c-17's, c- 130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel, to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure. for that, we have emergency generators. we have a navy ship that has helicopters that can move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with local officials to identify those critical infrastructure and how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple of other things we are concerned about, as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can also get to work. a lot folks in jersey work in new york come in the city, and in other places where transportation may be hobbled. one of the things i mentioned is the possibility of us using federal assets, and military assets as well as taking inventory of the country that can be brought in so we can help people ge
initiative in california referendum indicates that the walls are coming down and some things from before. remember from the 1984 convention. he talked about raising taxes. that is no longer a taboo issue. i think you'll find some political liberal stuff and social liberal. >> the racial division on this is enormous. and exit polls, 60% of voters said they wanted to repeal the health care bill. large portions of african- americans and hispanics want to maintain it. a big challenge for democrats is that it is time to help unify power and government whether it was under johnson, carter, clinton, obama, they have seen their support among whites and plunge it said the delay. the challenge of convincing a much of white americans to benefit them is still on the table. the number you need to convince -- >> one of the problems the democratic party has had is that it has not been willing to defend government. it has always been specific. maybe obama learned something from his first term in terms of putting things into perspective. -- his victory speech had some of those elements. >> we will turn t
to try to put more women in congress across the country. i am proud that in california our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators. women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our members are great here, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator elapsed tammy baldwin [applause] senator idiolect maisie toronto. hirono. only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. that is very exciting. unfortunately we do not have kathy hochul this next congress, but the future is soon coming upon -- we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. we are still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success -- as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states? the house democratic women? because this is where the hopes and dreams of american families are. they may not know that, they may not know one party from the next and the rest, but we now that without roza deluaro we w
and legislative counsel for a former member of california. please welcome my colleague, mike franc. [applause] >> welcome heritage. good afternoon. there are two types of people in washington, those who really enjoy deep discussions about senate procedure and those who don't. welcome. i can see which category you fit in. this has become more and more important as we move forward. the dividing lines seem to be more stark yet obvious than at any time i have been in washington. we have four experts that will discuss the developments. the discussions will talk about president and the distinction between the two -- talk about the precedent and the distinction between the two. these individuals have a depth of experience that i think is unrivaled. let me introduce you before it turned over to the discussion. james wallner speak first. he has worked in the house and senate iand is currently the executive director for the senate steering committee. he is an agile to professor at catholic university. he has a degree from the university of edinburgh from scotland. he has authored numerous publications.
the way if is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from california is recognized. >> mr. speaker, as the republican of georgia deals with its first democratic transition of power, i spent the last few days speaking at length with the president and the new prime minister about the necessity to continue the pursuit of the rule of law. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, this is a critical moment for the georgian people that can either put the country on a path of sustainable democracy or turn back the clock on the tremendous gains that have been made since the rose revolution. mr. speaker, the united states must remain engaged with the new government to promote continued democratic reform. a robust democracy demands not only the ability of the majority party to advance the agenda, but also the preservation of the rights of the minority, to raise questions and ho
at its best. the differences that consume us, they seem to melt away. we saw it in california with the fires this summer and the terrible tragedy in aurora. there are no democrats and republicans during a crisis. just fellow americans. [applause] you know, we see leaders of different parties working to fix what is broken. neighbors helping neighbors to cope with tragedy. communities rallying to rebuild. a spirit that says in the end, we are in this together. we rise and fall as one nation. as one people. [applause] in boulder, that spirit has guided this country for more than two centuries. it has carried us through the trials and tribulations of the last four years. we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today, because of the resilience of the american people, our businesses have created 5 million new jobs. the american auto industry is back on top. american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace in 15 years. we are less dependent on foreign oil than any time in 20 years. home values, home construction is on the rise.
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